Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Physics Division

Physics Division Seminars

Physics Division Seminars bring us speakers on a variety of physics related subjects. Usually these are held in the Building 6008 large Conference Room, at 3:00 pm on the chosen day, but times and locations may vary. For more information, contact our seminar chairman,

Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri
Tel (Office): (865) 574-6124  (FAX): (865) 574-1268

If you should wish to subscribe to Email announcements of the Physics Division Seminars, please send email to "seminar-owner AT orph02 DOT phy DOT ornl DOT gov". In your message, please include your name and postal address, as well as your public email address.

Interesting seminars on related topics are available at the University of Tennessee Physics Department Colloquium Series.


Tue., September 29, 2015 at 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm (refreshments served at 2:40 pm)

Simulations of Supernovae and Their Massive Star Progenitors in 3D

Sean Couch, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
Bldg. 6008 Large Conference Room

Core-collapse supernovae are the luminous explosions that herald the death of massive stars. While core-collapse supernovae are observed on a daily basis in nature, the details of the mechanism that reverses stellar collapse and drives these explosions remain unclear. While the most recent high-fidelity simulations show promise at explaining the explosion mechanism, there remains tension between theory and observation. This is likely telling us we are missing important physics in our simulations. I will discuss some interesting candidates for such missing physics that could be crucial to the supernova mechanism. In particular, I will describe our efforts to develop more realistic initial conditions for supernova simulations with fully 3D massive stellar evolution calculations. Such realistic 3D initial conditions turn out to be favorable for successful explosions, in large part because they result in stronger turbulence behind the stalled supernova shock. I will also discuss the important role turbulence is playing in the supernova mechanism and what might be required for accurately modeling the turbulence in our simulations.

Contact: Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri, 865-574-6124


Previous seminars

2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003