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5. High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL) Project Completed Successfully
(B. A. Tatum)

We are pleased to report that the High Power Target Laboratory Project has been completed with the exception of the installation of the remote handling system bridge crane. The crane will be delivered by the end of January 2006 and installed during the first two weeks of February. In spite of a four month overrun by the facility modifications construction contractor, all of the technical equipment was installed prior to the end of September 2005. This was a tremendous accomplishment by the HRIBF technical staff and our incredible crafts team in spite of a very heavy HRIBF operations schedule! The entire Project Team is to be congratulated for a job well done!

Commissioning has also been completed in several stages. First, we tested the ion source and RIB analysis system in late September by extracting a stable ion beam and tuning it through the low energy analysis beamline to the diagnostics station above the target room. Secondly, a commissioning run with low intensity ORIC beam took place in October to demonstrate the performance of the ORIC beamline as well as the production of radioactive fluorine. Final commissioning of the entire system occurred on December 6, 2005 when a 1.8uA beam of 42-MeV deuterons was delivered from ORIC to the HPTL Target Station. A hafnium oxide target was coupled to an EBP ion source for the production of Al17F+ ions, and the measured beam intensity of Al17F+ on Faraday cup RA_3 (located at the end of the RIB Analysis beamline in Room C-212) was 8 x 106 pps. The measured yield was slightly better than the expected yield of 3 x 106 pps/uA, which had been measured in previous tests at the OLTF and on the RIB Injector. This improvement may be due to better transmission from the ion source to the diagnostics station. The background levels as measured by the Ge detector were quite low; less than 2 cps in the 511-keV peak during irradiation of the hafnium oxide target. The plot below shows the decay of activity deposited onto the Faraday cup. The data points are the number of 511-keV gamma-rays detected during 15-second counting periods after the collection was stopped. The fit to the data indicates a decay half-life of 64.2 seconds, while the half-life of 17F is 64.5 seconds.

Figure 5-1: Decay of the activity deposited on the Farady cup RA_3.The data points are the number of 511-keV gamma-rays detected during 15-second counting periods after the collection was stopped. The fit to the data indicates a decay half-life of 64.2 seconds, while the half-life of 17F is 64.5 seconds.



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