4 Data Parallelism



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Next: 4.1 Array Operations Up: PL Chapter Previous: 3.5 Environmental Inquiry

4 Data Parallelism

 

Fundamental physical phenomena, such as thermal generation/dissipation properties and electronic signal speeds, place theoretical and practical limits on the computation speeds of single processor systems. Though these limits are currently roughly in the ``gigaflop" (a billion numerical operations per second) range, some contemporary applications of computational science require substantially greater speeds, as will most applications on the scale of grand challenge problems. It is becoming more feasible to scale up computational capacity by adding processors than by increasing single processor speed. It is likely that all future applications involving massive amounts of computation will make significant use of parallelism.

Applications may employ (either or both of) two principal forms of parallelism, which here will be termed ``data parallelism" and ``process parallelism". Data parallelism involves performing a similar computation on many data objects simultaneously. The prototypical such situation, especially for computational science applications, is simultaneous operations on all the elements of an array-for example, dividing each element of the array by a given value (e.g., normalizing the pivot row in matrix reduction).

For the purposes here data parallelism will mean concurrent operations on array elements. Process parallelism involves performing different processes in parallel, where a process is an arbitrary sequence of computations. A subroutine, for example, is a process, as is any block of statements. An increasingly important form of process parallelism is evaluating two expressions simultaneously-two actual arguments, for example, in a procedure call. A number of approaches to specifying process parallelism have been developed, and process parallelism standards are beginning to appear [3]. This type of parallelism will be discussed in the next release of this chapter.

Process parallelism may be important in many applications of computational science, but because of the ubiquitousness of arrays in such applications, data parallelism is likely to be useful in most and critical in many. This section therefore focuses on parallel array operations, with particular emphasis on the extraordinarily rich set of such operations in Fortran 90.





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Next: 4.1 Array Operations Up: PL Chapter Previous: 3.5 Environmental Inquiry



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